Tuesday, 23 September 2014

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 23rd September

Although it's time-consuming to read so many blog posts each week (SCBWI people do write a lot!) I always learn something new. So I hope that you too will pick up some glorious pearls of wisdom from this week's Blog Break...

As well as a choice of surnames, the ever-generous Olivia Bright/Kiernan offers us a choice of blogging formats. Do you prefer reading about her thoughts on writing a great opening to your novel in a standard blog post, or to have them summarised in a vlog (with added whiteboardery?)

More choices present themselves with Larissa Villar Hauser's latest post, as it comes with a warning that the content is "really boring for anyone not interested in the brass tacks of self-publishing!" But if you are looking to self-publish, her advice on obtaining and managing ISBNs is invaluable.

I initially thought that Sue Hyams' 500 Word Challenge was going to be about flash fiction (my own personal word count obsession), but it turned out to be a post following her attempts to write 500 words a day for ten days. The results may surprise you (and indeed her!)

Bryony Pearce's plea for us all to take responsibility for childhood literacy may be preaching to the converted here in SCBWI land, but that doesn't make it any less true. How can we help those families who don't consider reading either a pleasure or a necessity?

Double Crystal Kite winner Candy Gourlay may already seem "kind of a big deal" in our world, but she's front page news in her native Philippines! Read Candy's interview with the Philippine Daily Inquirer, and the accompanying blog post about her Filipino book tour.

Nick.


A SCBWI member since 2009, Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner who currently writes children's short fiction for Stew Magazine (September issue out now).

Nick's most recent blog post finds him exploring a character he just can't stop writing about: The Evolution of Max.

No comments:

Post a Comment

We love comments and really appreciate the time it takes to leave one.
Interesting and pithy reactions to a post are brilliant but we also LOVE it when people just say they've read and enjoyed.
We've made it easy to comment by losing the 'are you human?' test, which means we get a lot of spam. Fortunately, Blogger recognises these, so most, if not all, anonymous comments are deleted without reading.