Tuesday, 9 September 2014

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 9th September

I'm aware that the same names crop up fairly frequently on the Blog Break, so I'm going to try this week to highlight posts from bloggers who we haven't heard from in a while.


Larissa Villar Hauser hasn't blogged since April, so she definitely qualifies! It might appear sometimes that self-published authors simply empty the contents of their hard drives into Amazon Kindle Publishing, but Larissa has been taking a more measured approach, as she notes in her post.

What turns a great book into an obsessive read? Blogging at The Edge, Sara Grant gets Book Mania when she explores the books that she's loved over the last few years, and tries to determine why they mean so much to her.

I didn't have room last week for Katriona Chapman's blog for Big Little Tales, but luckily I've managed to squeeze it in this time. It's a post which provides quite the visual feast as it explores Great Book Cover Designs.

I enjoyed reading about John Shelley's triumphant return to Japan over the summer, and the two exhibitions of his work. Like his trip, John's post is "busy, inspiring and very encouraging."

My last selection is a bit of a cheat, because Olivia Kiernan actually got into last week's Blog Break with her vlog. But that was written as Olivia Bright, whereas this week she's blogged under her real name. More than that, her blog post on Writing and Coping with Rejection is so full of wisdom that I simply had to include it!

Nick.


A SCBWI member since 2009, Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner who currently writes children's short fiction for Stew Magazine.

Nick's most recent blog post finds him looking away from despair, towards Higher Ground.

1 comment:

  1. Again, great selection Nick, I've enjoyed all of these as usual:)

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