Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 27th January

There's some serious love for UK YA books this week on the Blog Break, and especially for those fabulous book bloggers who do so much to share their love of reading, and to connect young readers with stories.

The whole Edge team get together to share their praise for the bloggers, and highlight not one, but two new awards for UKYA book bloggers. Meanwhile, Lucy Coats' post celebrates the amazing sales success of children's books in 2014, and looks forward to a barnstorming year for UKYA in 2015.

Have you ever tried to get hold of a beloved book, only to find that it's gone out of print? Space on the Bookshelf are having a celebration of Out of Print BUT Not Forgotten books this week, and invite you to submit your own suggestions. Well, I'd like to resurrect the fabulous 1950s Lensman series of sci-fi books, which I enjoyed very much as a teenager. Despite featuring dubious sexual politics and scientists using futuristic slide rules instead of computers, these books contain the greatest space battles ever conceived!


I enjoyed Sam Zuppardi's sketch of a balloon-man, and even more so in the light of his description of how the image came about, and his reflection on the serendipitous nature of creativity.

Finally, Nicola Morgan follows up her impassioned plea to save Falkirk School Library Service with a brilliant analysis of the value of libraries, and a blistering attack on the short-sighted culture of privilege that misunderstands and mismanages them. Go Libraries and Go Nicola!

Nick.


A SCBWI member since 2009, Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner who writes children's short fiction for Stew Magazine.

On his blog, Nick is thinking about flashbacks, and their use as a narrative device: Flashback to the Future.

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