Thursday, 5 March 2015

Network News: London - a London member tells us how his network helped him


Tim Collins is a member of the London network.




You are now extensively published. When did you first get published?
My first book was published exactly ten years ago, though I wrote non-fiction for adults for the first five years. I went to my first SCBWI event on the same day my first children’s book was published. I’d moved across from writing for adults, and needed to learn more about children’s publishing.
Which SCBWI network do you belong to?
I’ve been a member of the London network since 2010. I’ve also attended SCBWI events in Cambridge and in Oxford, where I live now.
What is the most important aspect of a SCBWI network for you?
Being in an active SCBWI network made it easier for me to give up work to write full time, as it forced me to get out of the house every now and then. The London socials stopped me from getting cabin fever when I was getting used to working from home.
Does your SCBWI network continue to be helpful?
I still attend the SCBWI socials when I can. The London socials often attract a mix of published writers, unpublished writers and industry professionals. I once met an editor who subsequently commissioned sample material from me, for example. And other writers have shared their experiences with particular publishers or packagers, which has been very useful.
Do you have a top tip for up and coming writer?
I would try out for a fiction packager such as Working Partner or Hothouse. You can learn a lot even if you don’t end up working with them. Also, getting involved with SCBWI as a volunteer can be a great way to get to know the industry.

2 comments:

  1. When are you coming to a London social? We miss you!

    ReplyDelete
  2. And don't forget the new Industry Insiders evenings too.

    ReplyDelete

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