Thursday, 4 June 2015

Network News: North West, Getting into a Routine

Steve in full flow
by Catherine Whitmore

I think we are ready to say that SCBWI North West really is up and running (quick - touch wood!).

Our first two events in January and March had a celebrity glow, with Steve Hartley, Melvyn Burgess and Nicola Morgan giving us the bums-on-seats factor. As importantly, our critique groups really began to take shape.


  
However, our May event was more what we had in mind when we re-launched the North West. Our own Yvonne Matthews, aka Vonny Bee, bravely and very effectively took the reins in a member-led discussion. She shared her experiences of a workshop on story arc. All the members that I spoke to came away having either learned something new, or having realised something lacking in their work-in-progress.

Our critique groups are now split based on age-group. Some really productive critique groups are forming. We’re getting to know each other’s styles and eager for our member’s (and friends’) stories to succeed.

Our next event will be at the beautiful and recently rejuvenated Manchester Central Library. We’re having a Sketch and Scrawl Crawl around this historic building. Contrary to many of our writer’s fears, we don’t need to brush up on our stick men (although a certain Mancunian didn’t do badly out of them!) There will be writing exercises and a critique session so we all have every reason to look forward to it.
We have so many ambitious and driven writers in the North West and West Yorkshire,  that we really hope that, together, we can keep holding fun, productive and supportive events. 

Contact SCBWI North West for more details.

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Catherine SCBWI in 2012 and, having attended and loved three conferences, they got her! Now she is very excited to be the other half of the Network Organising team for the North West of England. She is writing a YA, coming-of-age novel.

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