Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 1st December

Logo by Melany Pietersen
Congratulations to everyone who has made the Undiscovered Voices long list - I do hope that there won't be too much nail biting over the festive period when you could be eating lovely Christmas food instead!

I also hope you're not all completely sick of hearing about the SCBWI Conference, because there were a few blog posts that appeared too late to make it into last week's Conference Blog Challenge. Jeannie Waudby discusses the ten things she loves about the conference, Kate Peridot helps us to talk like a pirate and Sarah McIntyre gives a keynote-speaker's-eye view of the weekend.

Meanwhile, several thousand miles from Winchester, Nicky Schmidt has been thinking about the importance of setting in writing, and how much richer her work has become since she started writing about her native South Africa.

Kate Walker is discovering some things about herself as a writer too, stepping out of her comfort zone to take on a new challenge for NaNoWriMo.

What in the World is a Diverse Author? It seems that diversity means different things to different people, as Candy Gourlay explains.

As much as I try to stay upbeat on the Blog Break, publishing remains full of The Bad Stuff We Try Not to Talk About. Maximum respect, then, to Sally Poyton for telling us all about her hebdomas horribilis (or really bad week).

Finally, on a more cheerful note, if you've ever wondered what we do all day at Words & Pictures, you might want to check out this series of slightly crazy short videos that the editorial team have put together!

Nick.



Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner and has recently received the SCBWI Magazine Merit Award, for his short story The Last Typewriter.

Click here to read Nick's latest blog post for Notes from the Slushpile.

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