Tuesday, 22 December 2015

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 22nd December

Logo by Melany Pietersen
Yikes! How did it get to be the 22nd of December already? I hope that all your shopping, wrapping and cooking is safely in hand, and you can settle down for ten minutes with a cup of festive beverage and a selection of great SCBWI-BI blog posts...

Dom Conlon's Orry and Dice – an Edge of Christmas Story is not your typical light festive tale! Combining child characters, Greek mythology and an almost painful sense of foreboding, Dom delivers a story that both grips and rewards.

OK, full disclosure before the next link - I am totally a cat person! That said, I enjoyed Olivia Levez's exploration of writers and their dogs, which takes in Stephen King, Nick Mackie and Jo Franklin.

I hadn't really stopped to consider the challenges of translating books for foreign markets, so I found Sarah McIntyre's recent post a real eye-opener. Sarah chats with Örkény Ajkay about the intricacies of translating Oliver and the Seawigs into Hungarian.

Bryony Pearce is pretty angry about people who belittle YA, especially if they are YA authors themselves. Pull on your flameproof suit and read Bryony's post at The Edge.

In her final post of the year for Picture Book Den, Juliet Clare Bell is in a reflective mood, musing about beautiful books, morals in storytelling and (gulp) self-actualization!

Finally, just a quick mention for Jamie Smart's brilliant fundraising initiative to print and send free comics to children in UK hospitals. You can donate to the appeal here.

Merry Christmas everyone!

Nick.



Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner and this year received the SCBWI Magazine Merit Award, for his short story The Last Typewriter.

Click here to read Notes from the Slushpile's Christmas blog post.

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