Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Ten-Minute Blog Break - 5th January

Logo by Melany Pietersen
A belated welcome to 2016 - may it bring you all that you want, plus a few good things you didn't know you wanted! The turn of the year is a time for both reflection and looking forward, and there's plenty of that going on in this week's SCBWI blog posts...

Sheila Averbuch had a truly triumphant end to 2015. But behind her apparently effortless success lies a story of doubt, heartbreak and rejection that hits very close to home.

Dom Conlon's story is both different and yet similar to Sheila's. His 2015 was a year of trying: trying to learn his craft, trying new ideas and trying to get "out there." Find out how he got on in his blog post.

Dom isn't the only one trying to write and wondering why it isn't always as simple as it looks. K.M. Lockwood is chasing down her elusive muse and asking if it's possible to call him/her/it forth on demand.

Someone who seems to have their muse firmly under control is Sarah McIntyre, who has been as prolific as ever over the festive season. I especially enjoyed Sarah's defence of the colouring book as a valid creative endeavour (people are way too sniffy about these!)

Sarah Broadley's New Year Resolution is to do more writing - no, make that a LOT of writing. And she has her own NaNoManifesto to prove it!

Finally, in the spirit of new beginnings, I wasn't going to include any Christmas posts this week. However, I couldn't resist this one by Nicola Morgan, which is a hymn in praise of slowing down and giving yourself space to think. As the hectic rush of January sets in, it's doubly good advice.

Nick.



Nick Cross is an Undiscovered Voices winner and 2015 honours recipient of the SCBWI Magazine Merit Award for fiction.

Click here to read Notes from the Slushpile's Christmas 2015 blog post.

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