Saturday, 15 October 2016

The Watcher of the Skies Poetry anthology is out.

By Charlotte Comley

An exciting new poetry collection is out, and SCBWI member Dom Conlon is to be included.

Dom writes:

Poetry is the moment. Poetry is the cry, the shout, the look and the stop.

Poetry is now.

I'm living in the moment of celebration, and it's all thanks to poetry. I'm feeling the shout of having one of my poems published by one of the most exciting champions of poetry - The Emma Press as their latest anthology for children, The Watcher of the Skies, is released.


The Watcher of the Skies looks out into the universe and finds the heart we all share. It's a remarkable (even by Emma Press standards) collection of poems by established and rising stars. And I'm one of them. It's a little bit astounding. A little bit extraordinary. Like looking at a planet through a telescope for the first... ok, the MILLIONTH time. The excitement never leaves you. The sense of wonder is eternal.

And my poem, How Planets Talk, is part of this wonder. I've written many times about how much I get from SCBWI - that remarkable organisation of like-minded stars. The regular meetings, the online support, the big Conference, all of these things have helped me and my writing, and the publication of The Watcher of the Skies is a visible sign, a marker along my journey.

I've been sat reading through the book, enjoying poems - all so unique - by Sohini Basak, John Canfield, Mary Anne Clark, Mandy Coe, Rebecca Colby, Dharmavadana, Julie Anna Douglas, Sarah Doyle, Inua Ellams, David Harmer, Philip Monks, Cheryl Moskowitz, Dale Neal, Rachel M Nicholas, Richard O'Brien, Suzanne Olivante, Abigail Parry, Gita Ralleigh, Robert Schechter, Lawrence Schimel, Mike Sims, Camellia Stafford, Jon Stone, Kate Wakeling, Rob Walton and Kate Wise!

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