Thursday, 24 October 2013

Network News: Remember, remember...

... the fifth of November is the next London Professional Series Event: Poachers Turned Gamekeepers.

Ahead of this event,  here’s a little teaser with some tips from folks who are professionals within the publishing industry by day and writers by night,
The line-up is impressive...

 Robin Stevens, Editorial Assistant at Orion and soon to be published author of Murder Most Unladylike (Random House 2014)

Non Pratt Editor at Catnip and author of Trouble

Phil Earle Sales Director at Bloomsbury and author of Saving Daisy

With your WRITER'S HAT on, what's your top tip for writing?

Non Pratt - I wrote a blogpost over on Author Allsorts about the Seven Deadly Sins and how they apply to writers. My top tip is probably number five…

Phil Earle - Love your characters, but be horrible to them....

Robin Stevens - Just keep going! There seem to be an unbelievably large number of words in a book, especially when you’re in the middle of writing one. But you have to finish it so you can go back and improve it later.

With your EDITOR'S HAT on, what's is your top tip for writing?

Non Pratt - Write because you love it: it shows.

Phil Earle - Don't give up the day job. Have another way of earning money!

Robin Stevens - Don’t be afraid to ask yourself big questions about plot and character, and to make huge changes if you or your early readers think they’re necessary. The book will be so much better for it.



Sally Poyton organises The London Professional Series with David Richardson. She writes  mostly YA Fantasy. Up until 2011 it was a secret pursuit, but now Sally's come out of the writing closest. She's dyslexic, so writing is not without its difficulties but she LOVES it. Sally is also an author on Space on the Bookshelf, a blog that celebrates children's literature with reviews, views and more.

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