Sunday, 20 July 2014

(Not) A Word from Your Editor

Jan Carr is having a well-deserved break from the editorial this week, so I, Nick Cross, will be attempting to fill in. I won’t go on too long, because I know that this post is merely an amuse-bouche before today’s main course - the Chalkface Challenge results!

They’ll be going live early this afternoon, so keep your eyes peeled. I did enter the Chalkface Challenge myself but (spoiler alert) didn’t make the shortlist. Instead, I got some lovely feedback from the students of Chew Stoke School, which is really going to help me focus my book.

So, what’s been happening this week on Words & Pictures?


Elsewhere in the SCBWI world, we had a spirited Facebook debate on diversity, prompted by Amy McCulloch’s article in the Guardian.

We also celebrated the sixtieth birthday of one of our most beloved Scoobies, the wonderful Maureen Lynas. Not wanting to let the occasion slip by without the proper fanfare, Maureen’s daughter Katherine organised Maureen Day! The tributes kept coming, in the form of poems, pictures and treasured memories; here are just a few of them:

Amanda Lillywhite
Lesley Moss

Paul Morton
Have a great week, and good luck to everyone who entered the Chalkface challenge. I’ll see you on Tuesday for the Blog Break.

Nick.


A SCBWI member since 2009, Nick Cross is a former Undiscovered Voices winner who currently writes children's short fiction for Stew Magazine.

Nick's latest blog post is a guide to writing flash fiction, to celebrate the July issue of Stew!

2 comments:

  1. Thank you Nick!
    I'm so pleased you posted the Marvellous Maureen tributes and I'm still catching up on the FB debate:)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh my goodness! I've only just spotted this. Thanks Nick and Jan!

    ReplyDelete

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